SUMMARY OF READING- DESIGNING INTERACTIONS 6

“DESIGNING INTERACTIONS 6”

This reading allowed me to understand how I-MODE service worked with collaboration, customer experience, building their technologies, their processes, and the important people who formed and made it all successful.

This reading is about mobile applications (History and Evolution of Phones), how it was tested for people, and how people interacted to it. Below are some of the important details that I want to share with the Interactive Culture Auckland Group.

TAKESHI NATSUNO:

–       Managing director, in charge of strategy (I-MODE CELLPHONE SERVICE from DoCoMo in Japan)

FRAN SAMALIONIS:

–       Leader of Service Design Practice (IDEO)

–       Mentored 3 young founders in London (explains their Philosophy and Process for Designing Services).

–       Has pioneered the practice of service design at IDEO, both in San Francisco and London

–       An enthusiastic proponent of empathic human factors research techniques as an integral component of every project

THE PHONE IN THE HALL:

Before it there were simple interactions (methods of contacting people) and it wasn’t as complex compared to the modern cellular phone service.

MODERN CELLULAR PHONE SERVICE:

The process goes like this: Look up to a person’s number and dial it (contacts list)

TURN ON PHONE > WAIT FOR IT TO BOOT> GO TO MENU>SELECT “CONTACTS”> CHOOSE FIND CONTACTS> THUMB 7 FOUR TIMES TO ENTER THE FIRST LETTER OF HER NAME> “S”> SCROLL TO “SMITH ON CEDAR”> SELECT AND SEND!!

 

If you knew the number, you can dial it yourself:

HOW?

TURN ON PHONE > WAIT FOR IT TO BOOT> ENTER THE 7 DIGITS (on the numeric keypad)> SEND!!

 

Modern cellular phones are so much complex and difficult to use. It was hard to adjust to the level of its technology.

 

 

TYPICAL CELLPHONE OPTIONS:

–       Messaging

–       Music

–       Games

–       Organizer functions

–       Personal preferences

–       Phone book

–       Calls

–       Web based services

These are supported with an Instruction Manual  (around 100 pages).

DEVELOPMENT OF PHONE SERVICES:

Early days—–àService Provider increased their revenue (attracting new customers)—-àInteractions were designed to be simple and easy to learn and adopt—-àFacilitated by human operators

I-MODE IN JAPAN= from 0 to 33 million subscribers in only 3 Years

Their services offered:

-Internet Access on the phone

-Not very easy to learn Interacting “Through PHONE”

“SMS” began (short message service) which was in Europe

DUBBED “Texting” —> instigated first in FINLAND by “NOKIA”

“Young Expert Users of Phones”= TOKYO or HELINSKI= elite operators of modern telephones.

 

WHAT IS SPIN OUT?

–       Where the mother company keeps the ownership by providing the venture capital but gives the appointed leader enough freedom to escape the weight of the corporate structure and culture of the parent. This allows a small team of dedicated individuals who are highly motivated to succeed and are able to take advantage of the money and technology of the parent, without having a complex history.

KEICHI INOKI (entrepreneurial leader of I- MODE)

His vision:

FIRST: “Designing the service so that “even children will use it”.

SECOND: Had a vision of a much larger opportunity- observing behaviors of his son, daughter and friends.

THIRD: His vision became clearer: Service should appeal to young people and amateurs.

MARI MATSUNAGA

-Mother of I-MODE

-Asia’s most powerful Businesswoman in 2000 by Fortune Magazine

-Written a book (development of I-MODE)

-Presented this concept as the image of the “concierge”. (I just want to make it a satisfactory personal and useful supporting tool for your life”.

TAKESHI NATSUNO (development of the I-MODE SERVICE)

-Met Mari Matsunaga when he was a student intern at RECRUIT

-Excellent workeràdiligent and ingeniously innovative, potential leader

-CHALLENGE: to persuade the third-party guys to develop—“Scaled down versions” small screens on the cellphones.

-OBJECTIVES AS OPERATORS:

–       How to design- terminals, handsets and branding

–       Make phones aesthetically appealing and pretty, cute

–       Sophisticated phones, rich capabilities

–       Happy subscribers= more money for them

“APRIL 2002: successfully introduced the internet way of thinking rather than the Telecom’s way of thinking to implement this service”.

-BIGGEST MISSION: Find Third- Party Content Providers, therefore Takeshi adjusted their technology to accommodate 3rd party guys, adjusted business model, adjusted marketing activities to their benefit (this was the essence of I-MODE introduction).

-IMPORTANT LESSON LEARNED: De Facto Standard is different from a De Jure Standard. (Comparing small fish, big fish and the whales, how others stand out).

De Facto Standard: we have to understand the difference. One technology would dominate and be very popular in comparison to other technologies.

Telecom Industry: De Jure Standard is “usual business”. To decide something standard and then uses it.

TAKESHI DEVELOPED A BUSINESS MODEL (balanced content of content providers)

CONTENT PORTFOLIO: allowed him to balance out “STRONG and WEAK POINTS”

4 CATEGORIES: Transactions e.g. banks, Database e.g. yellow pages, Information e.g. train timetables and Entertainment e.g. entertainment.

Banking Industry: Tough to persuade amongst all of the other E-commerce Guys

–       Airline Industry

–       Brokerage companies

–       E-bookstores

–       City stores

–       Ticket companies

Entertainment Category: Different interests

–       To get revenue from the end user was the final goal

Database and Information Content:

–       Easier to find participants

–       Already provided INTERNET-BASED versions of their products.

Content Provider—-à Transaction Contentß——-Richest Segment

STRATEGY: if you got some support from the most conservative guy, it’s much easier to get support from all the other guys”.

TAKESHI DEVELOPED A STRATEGY OF SUPPORT: Guarantee Support

“We will focus our efforts on the design of the service, the design of the handset, the design of the user feelings and the design of the marketing approach”.

HIGHLIGHT: 1 ½ YEARS to get support from 67 companies (was a lot back then) but now they have 2000 official content and more than 50,000 independent content providers.

Handset Design:

–       Very important

–       Very technical tool

–       Reflects your lifestyle

–       Feel is important

–       Shape (how round it should be is very important)

–       Little things are very important

UI DEVELOPMENT= hot to make everything intuitive

I-MODE:

–       User interface of the browser and phone should be easy enough for everybody.

–       Only a few pages of Manual

–       Great feature= Icon based communication, I-MODE button > launch browser and 4 Directional keys (navigate)

–       Developed more than 180 icons

–       Without icons- they couldn’t get support from young teens – girls and boys.

ADDITIONAL PHONE FEATURES:

–       Browser on a PC

–       Bookmarks

–       Favorites- websites

–       Cache function

 

LIVE WORK: service innovation and design company (LONDON)

FOUNDERS and PRINCIPALS: Chris Downs, Lavrans Lovlie and Ben Reason

“They all have common interests= Designing Services”

WHAT THEY LOOKED AT? (Service design)

Academic theory (value nets operate)

Anthropological work (human-computer interaction)

Interaction Design

SERVICE DESIGN: the design of intangible experiences that reach people through many different touch-points and that happen over time. Receive “Intangible Value”.

SERVICE EXPERIENCE MODELS:

-Represent intangible experiences

-Employ formats conveying experiences

-Evaluate viability of the services qualitatively to share concepts with potential users, colleagues and decision makers.

-“Faking is much quicker than trying to design”

EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPING:

GOAL: to get a very intimate and subjective idea about what the experience of using a service could be.

-Is experienced over time

-Network touch-points

 

SERVICE ENVY:

-Major challenge is to enable people to express who they are through the use of services instead of through ownership of things.

EVIDENCING:

-Archaeology of the future enables us to make early qualitative judgements about the implications of a design.

SERVICE BLUEPRINTING:

-a service blueprint describes a service in enough detail to implement and maintain it.

BLUE PRINT IS USED BY:

-Business process managers

-Designers

-Software engineers

-Works as a guide to service managers

-Informs a service manager about the features and quality of the service

-Implementation phase of the live work process

“SOME CUSTOMERS ARE SO USED TO AN EXISTING PRODUCT, IT DOES NOT EVEN CROSS THEIR MIND TO ASK FOR A NEW SOLUTION” – Dorothy Leonard, Harvard Business School

 

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES:

Diagram (relationship between empathic research and traditional market research–à context—àsubjects truth inspiration

 

MARKET RESEARCH:

-Involves a large number of participants

-Unlikely to yield inspiration

 

EMPATHIC RESEARCH

-If skillfully used can yield much inspiration

-Involves small numbers of subject

 

PROCESS:

Observations- customer, stakeholders > develop insights (craft insights) > framework> generate lots of ideas> prototypes (different levels of fidelities) > iterative (most effective solution)

 

TECHNOLOGY: (map of available technologies and a system’s approach)

HOW? Technologies will interact with each other

WHAT? They can support, they can’t support

HOW? You can make movement between channels seamless

 

CUSTOMER’S PERSPECTIVE:

-Their behavior around money

-What motivates them?

 

“CUSTOMER JOURNEY”= one of the frameworks that they found most useful in SERVICE DESIGN.

 

FRAMEWORK OF A CUSTOMERS JOURNEY:

-Helps you think about the Experiences and touch-points that exist before and after the most obvious parts of a service.

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